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Omar Sosa

Omar Sosa appears in the following:

Director Danny Boyle; Omar Sosa Gets 'Kind Of Blue'; Adam Davidson On Ticket Scalping

Tuesday, September 03, 2013

In this episode: Academy Award-winning director Danny Boyle talks about an unseen character from most of his films, the soundtrack. Boyle tells Soundcheck about handpicking music for Trainspotting, 28 Days Later, and most recently, his high-tech heist noir Trance.

Grammy-nominated composer and pianist Omar Sosa was inspired by Miles Davis' Kind Of Blue for his new record. Hear Sosa play songs from Eggun, which carries the spirit of Davis, live in the Soundcheck studio. 

And Planet Money's Adam Davidson explains why even with ticket scalping concert ticket prices are just too low. 

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Omar Sosa Gets 'Kind Of' Blue

Friday, January 25, 2013

Watch pianist Omar Sosa perform live in the studio. Plus, he explains his upcoming 'tribute' album to Miles Davis.

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Country Music Back In New York; Omar Sosa, 'Kind Of Blue' Vs. 'Bitches Brew'

Friday, January 25, 2013

Pianist Omar Sosa returns to the studio to play songs from his new album, Eggun, which is inspired by one of the greatest jazz albums of all time: Miles Davis' Kind Of Blue. Then, a Soundcheck Smackdown on two classic Miles Davis recordings: Kind Of Blue versus Bitches Brew.

In Studio: Omar Sosa

Monday, September 05, 2011

Jazz pianist Omar Sosa’s fifth solo album, Calma, is filled with subtle and shimmering sounds – and hints of electronic and ambient music. He joined us back in May with his trio to perform in our studio.

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In Studio: Omar Sosa

Wednesday, May 04, 2011

Jazz pianist Omar Sosa’s fifth solo album, Calma, is filled with subtle and shimmering sounds – and hints of electronic and ambient music. He joins us with his trio to play live in our studio.

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Omar Sosa Live

Thursday, April 09, 2009

Three-time Grammy-nominated Cuban composer and pianist Omar Sosa has long been influenced by his African roots. On his latest album, Across the Divide, he explores how popular music was shaped by the tunes that entered two ports during the slavery years: Havana and Chesapeake Bay. He joins us to talk ...

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