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In Discussion: Lenny Kravitz

Friday, January 13, 2012

Early in his career, musician Lenny Kravitz sang about curbside discrimination in New York on the song “Mr. Cab Driver.” He joins us to explain how racism in the Obama era inspired the title track of his latest album, Black and White America. Plus, he talks about his role in the upcoming screen adaptation of the young-adult sci-fi novel The Hunger Games.

This is an encore edition of Soundcheck.

Guests:

Lenny Kravitz

Comments [4]

Sly from USA

I wonder why you LK criticizers spent listening to an interview for more than 30 minutes of someone you don't care about? Just do something else with your precious time!

"Lenny is a poser who never got any respect from the rock crowd"? Honestly??? Where did you get this opinion from???

Jan. 14 2012 08:39 PM
Ro from SoHo

Lenny Kravitz may denigrate the European/US promotion of female perfection of thinness and cosmetic surgery, but the sexual-sale of the exposure of whatever-sized women and their "nether bits" as a basis for their value to their society or observers is equally appalling.

Women and men should be accepted for what they do and contribute, not for pandering to the distorted expectations of the unthinking and uncaring few who hold the rest to the ransom of simplistic symbols of the ideal woman.

Jan. 13 2012 02:41 PM

Lenny only has a career because he comes from industry parents. otherwise no one would care. people barely care as it is.

Jan. 13 2012 02:40 PM
Frank from Newark

Lenny is a poser who never got any respect from the rock crowd.

Jan. 13 2012 02:16 PM

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