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Amelia Earhart: Queen Of The Air

Thursday, July 05, 2012

Amelia Earhart, Los Angeles, 1928 (wikimedia commons)

75 years ago, Amelia Earhart disappeared while attempting to fly around the world. Now, there’s an expedition underway to try to solve, finally, the mystery of what happened to her. Over the years she’s become a kind of metaphor for being lost and alone - especially for artists. We've put together a playlist inspired by the pioneering aviator, including songs from Joni Mitchell, Everclear, The Handsome Family and more.

Comments [2]

barthm from colorado

some of the information that you have is incorrect. John Lembrect was the first to fly over Niku and he flew at 500ft. This was found to be to high. They tried it and found you couldn't see much at that altitude. Look at the Tighar Channel on you tube.

Jun. 12 2013 01:13 PM
Douglas Westfall from Orange, CA, USA

Amelia's Lockheed Electra was within 75 miles of her target Howland Island when her radio cut off. Chief Radioman Leo Bellarts said: "Her voice was loud and clear; sounded frantic on her last transmission. Then it cut off."

Nikumaroro is 350 miles south-east of Howland and at a right angle to her flight path -- and she didn't have charts for those islands.

Airman Richard Beckham flew over Nikumaroro (Gardner) seven days later and said: "We altered course to Gardner Island ... we always went low over the islands at 100 feet ... we couldn't see anyone, and we always scanned the beaches."

The US sent nine ships, 66 aircraft, and well over 3,000 sailors and airmen who covered well over 250,000 sq. miles of open sea and every island within a 650 mile radius of Howland.

Taken from, The Hunt For Amelia Earhart
Douglas Westfall, historic publisher, Specialbooks.com

Jul. 05 2012 08:48 AM

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