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Keith Sweat Wants To Help You 'Make It Last Forever'

The New Jack Swing pioneer says: "Everything that looks good to is not always good for you."

Thursday, February 28, 2013

Keith Sweat (Courtesy of the artist)

Back in 1987, millions of fans listened to Keith Sweat sing about love in his debut -- the R&B chart topper, “Make It Last Forever.” Now the singer, New Jack Swing pioneer and radio host is doing more than singing about love -- he’s writing about it too. His new book takes the name of his hit song – it’s called Make It Last Forever, The Do’s and Don’ts.

"I've been singing love songs forever, talking about makeups, breakups," Sweat says, "people making babies off my music -- I know that for a fact. So I figured I would take it to the next level....All my songs have been built on true life experiences and have a meaning to me. The book has just as much meaning."

On his song 'Something Just Ain't Right':

This was inspired by a relationship I had -- it's about a young lady who cheated on me. I was living in New York at the time, she went to visit some people in Atlanta -- and it was another man. I heard about it through someone who squealed on her.

On who he turned to, when he had rocky relationships:

Music sometimes can be therapy. Back in the day when I was hurt I'd turn to The Stylistics or Luther Vandross. Their songs made me feel like I could get through this.

One his radio show The Sweat Hotel:

People call in for apologies, confessions and the maintenance man. They apologize for what they may have done. Confessions is when they've been holding on for something so long, that it haunts them, and they want to confess it. The maintenance man is where I come in. For those who have a kind of tarnished relationship I help to fix it. For those without a man, I'm their maintenance man, so I talk to them at night and make them feel good about themselves.

On the style he pioneered in the late 1980s with Teddy Riley - New Jack Swing:

New Jack Swing was a combination of hip hop and R&B -- hip hop beats with R&B rhythms. We came up during the time when rap music was starting to make a big impression on people. I could actually see how the tide was turning, so I said, why don't we add some R&B flavor to hip hop beats -- and it worked, from Bobby Brown to Bell Biv Devoe, to myself.

On what he's learned:

Everything that looks good to is not always good for you. As you learn what you want in your life, your values become a whole lot more.

Guests:

Keith Sweat

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