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New Music Service Aims To Keep You Focused

Monday, March 11, 2013

Focus@Will's online player (Focus@Will.com)

The Harley Davidson Motor Company recently made news when it banned all music from its factory floors. No more headphones, no more radios, no more piped in music. Now, of course, this ruffled some feathers… some rather large, burly ones. But let’s face it – music can be pretty distracting.

However, a new online music streaming website called Focus@Will is betting on music as a way to keep listeners focused – particularly when they're trying to read, or study, or work. Founder Will Henshall joins us to explain the science behind the service. 

Do you listen to music at work? If you do, what type of music keeps you on track? Leave us a comment below. 

Guests:

Will Henshall

Comments [8]

Charles D.

I have been using the system for roughly 3 or 4 months now and I find that if I am not interrupted, I get almost twice as much done while listening to focus@will versus other music sources. That is productivity that I can quantify...

Mar. 20 2013 01:48 PM
Nick

Focus@Will has provided myself and my team with a new way to get things done. I have never lost track of time like I do with their station. I strongly recommend it for the do-ers and workers out there that want highly intensive, highly productive periods of time throughout the day. It just works.

Mar. 20 2013 12:25 AM
JD from Minneapolis, MN

I have been an avid listener of internet radio for years while I work. My favorites are RadioParadise.com, a little Soma.FM (Groove Salad), and Technobase.FM from Deutschland late in the afternoon to get things done. Then, one day I got the link to Focus@Will – and my listening habits have changed forever. I seriously produce like I have a coffee IV drip in my arm. Time passes, I miss lunch, and often have to remind myself to take a bathroom break. Whatever this science is, it works. For real.

Mar. 19 2013 08:07 PM
Gabriel

Yes, snake oil it is. Blurting out "science based" stuff about "regions of the brain" that respond to this or that type of music is just nonsense. And then calling it "productivity music", c'mon...I hope not a lot of people are duped into paying for this "service".

Mar. 18 2013 11:31 AM
Stefan from Hollywood

I heard of a study that said music could put people into theta bainwave patterns in five minutes, where it would take 45 with meditation. Music's powerful stuff.

Mar. 13 2013 11:56 PM
Harry Schillin from New York City

I'm a kid with ADD and I love to listen to music when I work and when i heard about this, I literally ran the stairs to bookmark it. I'm actually using it right now!!! There was just one thing i didn't catch during the interview, what was the name of the system that is sensitive to music? I want to do some further research.

Mar. 12 2013 04:46 PM
Sara Koshi from Manhattan, NY

This is great. It works. I like music that does not distract or pounce. It is like listening to bird sounds or running water. The little changes in the flow, wakes me up but not to jolt me out of my thoughts.
The only problem.. is that my Internet Explorer doesnt work with the 'Beta' web site. Will, is there another way?

Mar. 12 2013 08:48 AM
Allen Bank from Brooklyn, New York

Modern day snake oil... all the lingo and elements are there. Instead of a canvas covered wagon, the new practitioners can pajama it from their living rooms over the internet.

Beat that bass drum and roll on from town to town!

Mar. 11 2013 10:03 PM

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