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Best Music Videos Of 2013 (So Far)

Pitchfork staff writer Lindsay Zoladz shares five of her favorite new music videos.

Thursday, April 11, 2013

Screen shot of Cat Power's music video for the song 'Manhattan.'

This week, Soundcheck has been asking listeners: what was the very first music video that made an impact on you? Today we turn to Pitchfork staff writer Lindsay Zoladz for her answer -- plus she shares a list of some of her favorite music videos of 2013 (so far). 

 

Beach House, "Wishes" 

It hits that internet viral sweet spot where there's something sublime about it in and of itself -- but it also can play off as funny or a parody in some way. The video was directed by Eric Wareheim, of the comedy duo Tim and Eric. They have the whole viral video aesthetic on lock.

 

Cat Power, "Manhattan" 

It's from her record Sun, from last year. It's a very personality-driven video, it's just Chan Marshall (a.k.a. Cat Power). The camera follows her through Manhattan and captures these almost Woody Allen-esque shots. I think it captures Cat Power at a neat point in her evolution. In the early part of her career she was stricken with stage fright, and was not known for being this great charismatic live performer. But at this point in her career she's coming into this charisma to the point that she can carry a video on her own.

 

Robin Thicke ft T.I. & Pharell, "Blurred Lines"

What is so captivating about [the video] is that it hits this weird alchemy where, for something to become viral it's this weird combination of -- I can't tell if this is the stupidest thing I've seen or the greatest. It's goofing on video tropes and doesn't take itself too seriously. It plays around with objectifying Robin Thicke himself.

 

Majical Cloudz, "Childhood's End"

 

The Knife, "Tooth for An Eye"

Guests:

Lindsay Zoladz

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