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Classical music goes Underground

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Tuesday, February 12, 2008

Stations on the London Underground are piping out recordings of classical music to calm down commuters and discourage anti-social behavior. How does it sound? And could such a tactic work in New York? Neil Fisher, classical music editor of the Times of London, offers his review. Also: the funky organ trio Soulive join us to talk about their latest album, "No Place Like Soul," released on the re-launched Memphis label Stax Records.

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A trial scheme of playing classical music in London's Underground stations proved so successful that it has been extended to 40 stations on the transit network. What's more surprising are the music playlists, full of lesser-known works by Rimsky-Korsakov, Berlioz and others. Neil Fisher, classical music editor of the London ...

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Soulive... Live

The funk-soul organ trio Soulive started jamming eight years ago in Woodstock, NY, and ended up opening for acts like The Rolling Stones and the Dave Matthews Band. They join us to talk about their latest album, No Place Like Soul, under the re-launched Memphis label Stax Records.

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