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There Will Not Be "Blood" at the Oscars

Thursday, February 21, 2008

Jonny Greenwood's score for "There Will Be Blood" has won critical praise, but a technicality disqualifies it from the Oscar race. Today, guests including Jon Burlingame, film music historian and Variety writer, and Daniel Schweiger, soundtrack editor of Filmmusicmag.com, weigh in on the 2008 Best Soundtrack nominees: "Atonement," "The Kite Runner," "Michael Clayton," "Ratatouille" and "3:10 to Yuma." They also examine the proliferation of European composers in Hollywood.

Weigh in: Who do you think should win the Oscar for Best Original Score?

Guests:

Jon Burlingame and Daniel Schweiger,

Comments [9]

Mike Barker from Flushing

The score from "There will be blood" is amazing. As I watched, I thought I wanted to listen to it. It, however, violates a basic rule of film scores; I noticed it throughout the movie.

Feb. 21 2008 02:30 PM
Noah Wimmer from The Bronx

Thank you, it's always good to get exterior confirmation that reaffirms you're not nuts. My girlfriend also didn't like it, so we're not alone in the universe.

Feb. 21 2008 02:29 PM
Gabriel from NYC

Noah. You are absolutely right. I thought something was wrong with me for not liking this movie. Its just not that good. PTA once again proves his mediocrity.

Feb. 21 2008 02:23 PM
Gabriel from NYC

Innovative does not mean good. This score was innovative (not necessarily original) and it is pretty good but it doesn't entirely work. It deserves recognition for being different but it is too flawed to be Oscar worthy. Jonny Greenwood will only develop as a movie composer, his future scores may deserve the hype he is getting now for There Will Be Blood.

To the speak to something one of the guests saiid the beginning of the score wasn't original at all. Tense, yes but it certainly has been done before. Have you not seen 2001: A Space Odyssey?

Feb. 21 2008 02:21 PM
Noah Wimmer from The Bronx

I don't get the hype. I thought There Will Be Blood was the worst movie i've seen in a very very long time and the soundtrack was god awful! it induced anxiety through the whole movie which didn't go with the film AT all. (in my own unsophisticated opinion) it was overly repetitive. The soundtrack made me THINK something would happen, but nothing ever did!! Aggh, I saw it a week ago and I still get mad about it. Worst movie ever.

agh, it just came on the show .. I'm gonna have to turn it off, it just prokes an awful reaction in my belly

Feb. 21 2008 02:07 PM
ab

I have the Michael Clayton soundtrack-- very atmospheric/ambient, moody. I love it. It worked quite well in the movie really setting the tone which I think really contributed to the overall weighty impact of the movie.

Feb. 21 2008 01:35 PM
Gregory Mortenson from Tri-State

from Wired.com blog:

The disqualification has been attributed to a designation within Rule 16 of the Academy's Special Rules for Music Awards (5d under "Eligibility"), which excludes "scores diluted by the use of tracked themes or other pre-existing music."

Greenwood's score contains roughly 35 minutes of original recordings and roughly 46 minutes of pre-existing work (including selections from the works of Arvo Pärt, as well as pieces in the public domain, such as Johannes Brahms' "Concerto in D Major"). Peripheral augmentation to the score included sporadic but minimal useage (15 minutes) of the artist's 2006 composition "Popcorn Superhet Receiver."

Feb. 21 2008 11:26 AM
Masko Dougherty from Hastings On Hudson, NY

What was the "technical disqualification" of the Music for --There Will Be Blood--from the Oscars?

Feb. 21 2008 09:54 AM
Joe Blow from North Pole

I liked Michael Clayton - futuristic, evocative and modern, unlike some of the more traditional scores...

Feb. 20 2008 04:16 PM

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