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Behind the Universal Language

Friday, October 09, 2009

Does our response to music have a biological basis or is it shaped by our culture? We pose that question to two experts today: Dr. Jamshed Bharucha, a neuroscientist, musician and Provost and Senior Vice President of Tufts University; and Dr. Laura-Lee Balkwill, a psychologist at the Music Cognition Lab of Queens University in Canada. This is a repeat broadcast of Soundcheck.

Guests:

Dr. Laura-Lee Balkwill and Dr. Jamshed Bharucha

Comments [3]

Evan Smith from Nassau County

I wonder if any of the guests analyzed/studied John Coltrane's late period or so-called free jazz? I think it would be fascinating because some found that music to be angry. I found it pleasantly chaotic.

Oct. 09 2009 03:12 PM
Tom from Upper West Side

The perception of sound - whether the music of Beethoven or a car crash - is the result of a physical response to sound waves.

An example of the universality of music is the waltz's sweeping throughout the world in the 19th century. Its rhythm is that of the human heart beat - What could be more naturally universal?

Oct. 09 2009 11:08 AM
Tom from Upper West Side

The perception of sound - whether the music of Beethoven or a car crash - is the result of a physical response to sound waves.

A great example of the universality of music is the waltz's having swept the world back in the 19th century. The rhythm is that of the heart beat - and what could be more naturally universal?

Oct. 09 2009 11:05 AM

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