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Buy John Some Peanuts and Crackerjack

Thursday, May 15, 2008 - 01:48 PM

You know the song “Heart And Soul”? Sure you do – it’s the one every beginning pianist sits down and bangs out on the keyboard at school assemblies and the like. Or maybe you don’t… what everyone knows is the chorus of “Heart And Soul.” But there are verses, verses I never heard until the legendary jazz pianist Marian McPartland played the whole song for us in our studio back in the 90s, when she was a mere 121 years old. (Her series “Piano Jazz” has been a public radio fixture for decades – no exaggeration.)

Anyway, “Take Me Out To The Ballgame” is another of those songs we all THINK we know – but again, it’s just the chorus. Today, we’ll hear some of those long lost verses too. I don’t know about you, but I like finding out new stuff about thrice-familiar songs.

Do you have any other examples of songs that are familiar, popular, or just personal favorites, but that turned out to have another side to them?

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Comments [2]

thatgirlinnewyork

no conversation that concerns nutty bill veeck and harry caray would be complete without acknowledging the lovely nancy faust, queen organist at wrigley (and the old chicago stadium)for so many years. legend has it that caray became more willing to lead the crowd in singing it as his age and beer consumption increased.

makes me mourn the dismissal of a real organ at ballparks all the more--so much better than (often) repetitive pop music and other digital instrumentation there.

May. 15 2008 02:22 PM
Mary Thomas

We had the band sing Take Me Out to the Ball Game, the whole thing, at our wedding as a sort of "7th inning stretch." It was a blast!

May. 15 2008 02:17 PM

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