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A Forum for Impossible Music

Thursday, September 02, 2010

In many places around the world, musicians are the target of governmental censorship. And if authorities deem a song or style or simply the act of playing music too controversial, an artist can face threats or even imprisonment. But in Brooklyn, NY, Austin Dacey’s Impossible Music Sessions are working to give those artists a voice – and an audience.

To help explain, we’re joined by Dacey as well as two musicians brought together by the project - Saeid Nadjafi of Iranian band The Plastic Wave and Anastasia Dimou of Brooklyn band Cruel Black Dove.

 

Today's Playlist:

1- The Plastic Wave – “My Clothes on Other Bodies”

2- Baloberos Crew – “7 Minutes of Truth”

3- Hassan SALAAM (from New Jersy) – “7 Minutes of Truth”

4- The Plastic Wave – “Reaction”

5- Baloberos – Porra Pa

Guests:

Austin Dacey, Anastasia Dimou and Saeid Nadjafi

Comments [4]

Bahram

You gonna hear more of Natch (Saeid) and his new project (The Casualty Process) ASAP...

Sep. 04 2010 05:40 PM
Angie McQuaig from Berkeley, CA

Awesome show. Check out http://www.impossiblemusic.org/ where you can join the mailing list and support the organization.

Sep. 02 2010 02:39 PM
troy from Carroll Gardens

holy crap fest. that little bit of the plastic waves song you played sounded AWESOME! is that something we can buy somewhere...or is that impossible?

Sep. 02 2010 02:33 PM
SuzanneNYC from Upper West Side

Music can definitely heal and bring people together. One organization working effectively in this area is Musicians without Borders based in The Netherlands. They now have an office in the USA. Their work began in Bosnia and Kosovo and is now spreading to other parts of the world including Africa. For more information go to: http://www.musicianswithoutborders.nl/

Sep. 02 2010 02:19 PM

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