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Revival of the Fittest?

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Acts like Sharon Jones and The Dap-Kings and Eli (Paperboy) Reed present a soul sound that some cast as throwbacks to the sixties and seventies. Writer Siddhartha Mitter says that these revival acts walk a fine line between homage and pastiche. But New Yorker critic Sasha-Frere Jones, once a skeptic, says that they’re moving the genre forward.

Tell us: What do you think of revival acts? Leave a comment below.

Guests:

Sasha Frere- Jones and Siddhartha Mitter

Comments [22]

Felix from New Jersey

I love it. I went to Barbes in Brooklyn to see a Latin boogaloo revival band called Spanglish Fly. I hadn't heard music like that since listening to the radio as a teenager in the 1960s. I hadn't felt that way in equally long. There are certain sounds that you need brought back in your life and not just by listening to your old 45s.

Sep. 30 2010 01:01 PM
Steve G from Sweet New Jersey

One doesn't fetishise retro-soul, one digs it.

Sep. 29 2010 03:44 PM
carter from EV

It would be refreshing not to revisit a sound that is original and timeless from my youth. I am anxious and hoping some young person today translates his or her frustration and anger with the condition of the world today (injustice, hatred,narcissism,apathy,selfishness, etc) and create a new definition and protest which creates the next timeless music tradition they can embrace as their own.

Sep. 29 2010 02:50 PM
Raul Schwarz from Fort Worth Texas

I'm sure no one would question God or Nature for re-inventing it self !! Why second guess musicians? A creation is essentially a human's contact with the universe's forces... the most sacred communication! Blessed are those who do... and The jazz Passengers are the most creative Jazz group ever!

Sep. 29 2010 02:47 PM
hemingway is a dog from e villiage loud and clear

cory + maureen = kant + habermas/arendt

which equals

something approaching an appreciation of this complex problematic.

Sep. 29 2010 02:45 PM
Eytan from Brooklyn

I love a lot of the soul revival bands -- Sharon Jones, Mayer Hawthorne, and Fitz & The Tantrums are among my favorites. But I have to give more respect to an artists like Amy Winehouse who (with the help of Mark Ronson) gives a substantial twist to the genre. I think Amy is big reason the soul revival exploded in the last few years, and she has lyrics that really update the songwriting as well as a hip-hop flavor to the production that didn't quite exist in the 60's and 70's,

Sep. 29 2010 02:38 PM
Eytan from Brooklyn

I love a lot of the soul revival bands -- Sharon Jones, Mayer Hawthorne, and Fitz & The Tantrums are among my favorites. But I have to give more respect to an artists like Amy Winehouse who (with the help of Mark Ronson) gives a substantial twist to the genre. I think Amy is big reason the soul revival exploded in the last few years, and she has lyrics that really update the songwriting as well as a hip-hop flavor to the production that didn't quite exist in the 60's and 70's,

Sep. 29 2010 02:37 PM
maureen from Bk !!!!

GO Siddhartha!!!! we NEED to have this conversation about the politics of music and the appropriation and whitewashing of soul! GO! ...it isn't that music doesn't HAVE an apolitical experience or zone, it does -- but music ALSO has a political zone, happens in a historical frame and has a _political_ history --- a place where it is very definitely about power even if we do not wish to think or know this.

Sep. 29 2010 02:37 PM
J

Is the song "Billionaire" more relevant than "Mercedes Benz" because Billionaire is contemporary?

Mercedes Benz is the better song, musically and in terms of speaking to consumerism then and now!

Sep. 29 2010 02:35 PM
Cory

Give me a break with the politics, please. It's the music, stupid. Aretha was backed by all while Muscle Shoals sidemen. Berry Gordy wanted to make money, not politics. Edward Kennedy Ellington again: "If it sounds good, it is good."

Sep. 29 2010 02:35 PM
carter from Eastvillage

Sasha-Frere Jones stated correctly if you consider soul music was created by people in a time when african-americans were primarily shut out of american "mainstream" society and faced daily exposure to issues that were and still are morally wrong.

Sep. 29 2010 02:34 PM
hemingway is a dog from e village

innovation. imitation... innovation appropriates tradition to make the new. mimesis is always seeded with an innovative force. all repitition is unrepeatabe. cf monsieur deleuze. repetition and difference, my friends.

Sep. 29 2010 02:33 PM
seldon from brooklyn

Is this is also not partly indicative of the current state of music where all nearly types of music are accessible at anytime via download or other and thus all feed of and on each other for new hybridizations?

Sep. 29 2010 02:32 PM
seldon from brooklyn

Is this is also not partly indicative of the current state of music where all nearly types of music are accessible at anytime via download or other and thus all feed of and on each other?

Sep. 29 2010 02:31 PM
eugene from queens

http://www.examiner.com/fine-arts-in-new-york/review-sharon-jones-the-dap-kings-prospect-park

Innovation is left to a few artists. Well-crafted music of art of any kind is of itself and if it entertains people--more often isn't that enough?

For Jones & the Dap-Kings, the challenge will be the group's evolution in the years the come. Its sound influenced by the Motown and Stax labels is intrinsic to whom they are.

What is possible to change and incorporate: storytelling songs, message songs or the occasional ballade which could help to keep the content and texture of their sets fresh.

If a listener had only heard Jones & the Dap-Kings on CD or television, experiencing the band live was an electric jolt.

What accounted for that surge was a freedom of tempo. In a 4-beat bar, funk music emphasizes the 1st beat (on the "one").

The band in studio generally adopts a slow groove. In live performance, Jones & the Dap-Kings accelerated the tempo, the syncopated attack insistently stimulating an audience member's ear.

Sep. 29 2010 02:29 PM
boogmusic from Midtown

It's a very fine line between homage and poseury. Budos Band I think of less as Afro-Beat and more taking inspiration from the Ethiopiques sound.

Sep. 29 2010 02:26 PM
sean from bklyn

Okay, Sasha must be smokin' something. Antibalas better than Fela????!!!! What the ****?

Sep. 29 2010 02:26 PM
blossom

This is the stupidest thing I've ever heard on this show.

Really, what you're talking about is whether young folks owe a duty to support the work of other younger folk over appreciating the work of older folk, irrespective of what they happen to like. Would you make the same argument about film or literature? I think not.

I was going to to SJ and the Ds shows ten+ years ago and would never listen to someone like Martin Luther. (He sounds like warmed over 80s-90s music to me.)

And do you guys complain about Gwen Stephani+No DOubt or Lady Gaga repeating stuff that Blondie did in the 80s?

So stupid to try and intellectualize this.

Sep. 29 2010 02:25 PM
sean from bklyn

Okay, Sasha must be smokin' something. Antibalas better than Fela????!!!! What the ****?

Sep. 29 2010 02:24 PM
Alex from Brooklyn

One factor is the massive increase in reissues these days. Either on vinyl or through blogs.

Newly kindled (or long standing) interest in formerly obscure music results in a desire to see it performed live. Or play it.

Sep. 29 2010 02:20 PM
The Boogaloo Omnibus from Brooklyn

Say what you want about the soul revival, but Sharon Jones & the Dap Kings are innovative by being so great that they transcend imitation.

Sep. 29 2010 02:16 PM
Michael from Grand Central

To quote Duke Ellington, "There are only two types of music: good music and bad music." These two guests both need to lighten up and enjoy the revival! Context conshmext.

Sep. 29 2010 02:15 PM

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