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Regina Spektor On Her Russian Music Idol; Russia's Samizdat Movement; Hospitality Plays Live

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Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Regina Spektor. Regina Spektor. (Shervin Lainez)

In this episode: From Russia With Soundcheck week continues with Regina Spektor, the Moscow-born, the New York-based indie-pop star, who schools us about a personal hero, the late Soviet-era singer Vladimir Vysotsky.

Then, a look at "Samizdat" -- the name given to an underground, DIY counterculture that was a huge part of life in the old Soviet Union. There's an exhibit of Samizdat artifacts consisting of pamphlets, books, cheap cassettes and more collected at George Washington University's Gelman Library. The exhibit's curator, Mark Yoffe, explains the movement.

And, Brooklyn band Hospitality performs songs from it's second record, Trouble, in the Soundcheck studio.

From Regina, With Love

This week, Soundcheck has been celebrating Russian music in the lead up to the Olympics in Sochi. Listen to Moscow-born pop star Regina Spektor talk about one of her musical heroes, the Soviet-era singer Vladimir Vysotsky, the “the Bob Dylan of Russia.”

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Hear The Sounds Of Russia's Soviet-Era Counterculture

Samizdat is the name given to an underground, DIY counterculture that was a huge part of life in the old Soviet Union. There's an exhibit of Samizdat artifacts consisting of pamphlets, books, cheap cassettes and more collected at George Washington University's Gelman Library. The exhibit's curator, Mark Yoffe, explains the movement.

Comments [2]

Watch: Hospitality, Live On Soundcheck

Watch the Brooklyn indie pop band Hospitality perform songs from its brand new album, Trouble, in the Soundcheck studio.

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Gig Alert (гиг-анонс): Terem Quartet

It's "From Russia, With Soundcheck" Week -- and that means that we're "Gig Alerting" bands in, you guessed it, Russia. Tonight, the Terem Quartet -- a Russian folk music group -- plays in Sochi. 

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Comments [1]

db from Manhattan

How would you situate Pussy Riots in the contemporary Russian music scene? Do you see a musical contribution beyond their political statements?

Feb. 05 2014 09:32 PM

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