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Greg Kot On The Many Lives Of The Staple Singers; Broken Bells Play Live

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Monday, January 20, 2014

Mavis Staples' latest album 'One True Vine' was released in 2013. Mavis Staples' latest album 'One True Vine' was released in 2013. (Chris Strong/Courtesy of the artist)

In this episode:Throughout the 1950's, '60s and '70s, The Staple Singers created a unique mix of gospel, folk, and rock, earning legions of fans and countless musical devotees. And at 74, Mavis Staples is still winning Grammys and singing for large audiences around the world. Music critic Greg Kot chronicles the extraordinary legacy of the Staples family in his new book, I'll Take You There: Mavis Staples, The Staple Singers, And The March Up Freedom's Highway.

Then we revisit a 2010 interview and studio session with Mavis Staples upon the release of her Grammy-winning album You Are Not Alone.

 

 

And Broken Bells -- the project of James Mercer of The Shins and Brian Burton (a.k.a. Danger Mouse) -- perform "Holding On For Life," a new song from the highly-anticipated upcoming album After The Disco, plus an older favorite, in the Soundcheck studio.

 

Guests:

Greg Kot, James Mercer and Danger Mouse

The Staple Singers: A Group That Touched Many Lives, From Martin Luther King Jr. To Prince

Throughout the 1950's, '60s and '70s, The Staple Singers created a unique mix of gospel, folk, and rock, earning legions of fans and countless musical devotees. And at 74, Mavis Staples is still winning Grammys and singing for large audiences around the world. Music critic Greg Kot chronicles the extraordinary legacy of the Staples family in his new book, I'll Take You There: Mavis Staples, The Staple Singers, And The March Up Freedom's Highway.

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Hear: Broken Bells, Live On Soundcheck

Hear Broken Bells -- the collaborative band of The Shins' James Mercer and Danger Mouse -- play an acoustic version of a new song from its latest album, After The Disco, and an old favorite, in the Soundcheck studio.

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