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Stax Records; Lucy Wainwright Roche Plays Live; The Loudest Stadiums In Football

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Wednesday, December 04, 2013

In this episode: Stax Records built a soul music empire, but Memphis music historian Robert Gordon says it was more than a record label: Stax provided a refuge from the racial tensions roiling the South in the 1960's.

Then, songwriter Lucy Wainwright Roche -- the daughter of Loudon Wainwright III and Suzzy Roche -- stakes out her own territory on There’s A Last Time For Everything, a new album that features a collaboration Colin Meloy of The Decemberists, and a cover of Robyn's "Call Your Girlfriend." Hear her perform in the Soundcheck studio, with her mom.

And, this season, the NFL teams in Kansas City and Seattle are battling for the title of “loudest crowd roar at a sports stadium,” after a Chiefs game recently topped 137 decibels. We delve into it with The New York Times' Joyce Cohen and Chiefs super-fan Ty Rowton -- a.k.a. “X-Factor” -- who helped organize fans to break a decibel-record at the NFL team’s home, Arrowhead Stadium.

Stax Records: An Integrated Refuge

Stax Records built a soul music empire, but Memphis music historian Robert Gordon says it was more than a record label: Stax provided a refuge from the racial tensions roiling the South in the 1960's.

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Loud and Proud (And Dangerous?): The Battle Over Decibels In The NFL

Kansas City Chiefs fans and Seattle Seahawks fans are vying for the title of being the loudest football stadiums. But is louder really better? 

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Lucy Wainwright Roche: Folk And Family, In The Studio

Hear singer-songwriter Lucy Wainwright Roche perform in the Soundcheck studio.

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Download This: Jean-Michel Pilc

The jazz pianist Jean-Michel Pilc performs at the Cornelia St. Cafe Wednesday. Download "Un Poco Fandango."

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