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Google's Big Music Plans; Caffe Lena; Swearin' Plays Live

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Friday, November 08, 2013

Swearin' performs in the Soundcheck studio. Swearin' performs in the Soundcheck studio. (Michael Katzif / WNYC)

In this episode: In the wake of the first YouTube Music Awards, and with Google planning a music subscription service, Rolling Stone's Steve Knopper talks about whether Google has a grand -- some would say nefarious -- plan to take over the music world.

Then, Saratoga Springs' Caffe Lena has been an integral part of the folk scene since the 1960's. Musician Pete Kennedy and Jocelyn Arem -- editor of a new book and box set -- discusses the musical history of the famed coffee house.

And power punk band Swearin' strips away its fuzzy and loud songs for a surprisingly intimate set in the Soundcheck studio.

Guests:

Jocelyn Arem, Pete Kennedy and Swearin'

The YouTube Music Awards And Google's Big Music Plans

In the wake of the first YouTube Music Awards, and with Google planning a music subscription service, Rolling Stone's Steve Knopper talks about whether Google has a grand -- some would say nefarious -- plan to take over the music world.

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Caffè Lena Inspires A New Generation Of Folk Musicians

Saratoga Springs' Caffe Lena has been an integral part of the folk scene since the 1960s. We talk with Jocelyn Arem, who edited a new book and box CD set about the musical history of the coffeehouse, as well as composer David Amram and musician Pete Kennedy.

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Watch: Swearin', In The Studio

Watch Swearin' perform rare stripped-down versions from its latest album Surfing Strange live in the Soundcheck studio.

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Download This: Jason Marshall Quartet

The Jason Marshall Quintet performs at Central Park this Saturday for the Jazz & Colors Fest. Download "Cherokee."

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